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Revenues have climbed from the thousands in 1869 through the millions, the tens and hundreds of millions, now billions. As Heinz markets have grown from local to national to global from one product to a dozen, made famous through the 57 Varieties slogan at the turn of the century to several thousand today the idea of quality, that old-fashioned virtue now born again in the most advanced theories of management, has been the Heinz mainspring.

The first product was horseradish, and the glass of its bottle was clear. There was a reason: while competitors extended their horseradish with fillers, concealed from view in green glass jars, Founder Henry John Heinz took his stand on quality and proudly displayed his product in transparent bottles. See? No leaves, no wood fiber, no turnip filler.

Henry was 25. The food processing industry was even younger, and commercial preservation in cans and bottles had yet to earn the public trust; so the typical American diet was a dreary affair. Staples as of 1869 were limited to bread, potatoes, root vegetables and meat usually dried, smoked or salted. Cucumbers and pickles were the salads of winter; grapefruit was a distant rumor, except in Florida; tomatoes were called "love apples," an exotic Mexican fruit. And, Henry Heinz was taking the first steps in a journey that would help to change all that, forever.

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Revenues have climbed from the thousands in 1869 through the millions, the tens and hundreds of millions, now billions. As Heinz markets have grown from local to national to global from one product to a dozen, made famous through the 57 Varieties slogan at the turn of the century to several thousand today the idea of quality, that old-fashioned virtue now born again in the most advanced theories of management, has been the Heinz mainspring.

The first product was horseradish, and the glass of its bottle was clear. There was a reason: while competitors extended their horseradish with fillers, concealed from view in green glass jars, Founder Henry John Heinz took his stand on quality and proudly displayed his product in transparent bottles. See? No leaves, no wood fiber, no turnip filler.

Henry was 25. The food processing industry was even younger, and commercial preservation in cans and bottles had yet to earn the public trust; so the typical American diet was a dreary affair. Staples as of 1869 were limited to bread, potatoes, root vegetables and meat usually dried, smoked or salted. Cucumbers and pickles were the salads of winter; grapefruit was a distant rumor, except in Florida; tomatoes were called "love apples," an exotic Mexican fruit. And, Henry Heinz was taking the first steps in a journey that would help to change all that, forever. More...

 
       
 
         
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