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One hundred and fifty years ago [Summer 1826] Joseph Nicéphore Niépce succeeded in obtaining a camera picture on a polished pewter plate, sensitized with bitumen of Judea. This material has the unusual property of hardening in light (not blackening like silver salts) but its light sensitivity is small. Niépce needed 8-10 h[ours] exposure in sunshine. He named his invention "heliography." After dissolving the unexposed parts of the picture in oil of turpentine and rinsing the plate, there remained, without the need for any other fixing, a permanent bitumen image of the light drawing, the shadows being indicated by the bare pewter plate.

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One hundred and fifty years ago [Summer 1826] Joseph Nicéphore Niépce succeeded in obtaining a camera picture on a polished pewter plate, sensitized with bitumen of Judea. This material has the unusual property of hardening in light (not blackening like silver salts) but its light sensitivity is small. Niépce needed 8-10 h[ours] exposure in sunshine. He named his invention "heliography." After dissolving the unexposed parts of the picture in oil of turpentine and rinsing the plate, there remained, without the need for any other fixing, a permanent bitumen image of the light drawing, the shadows being indicated by the bare pewter plate. More...

 
    Joseph Niépce, Inventor of Photography - 1826
  Joseph Niépce, Inventor of Photography - 1826
Joseph Nicéphore Niépce was a French inventor, now usually credited as the inventor of photography and a pioneer in that field. Niépce developed heliography, a technique he used to create the world's oldest surviving product of a photographic process...
 
       
 
         
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