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The Mongol invasions of Japan of 1274 and 1281 were major events of macrohistorical importance, despite their ultimate failures. These invasion attempts are among the most famous events in Japanese history, and due to their role in setting a limit on Mongol expansion, are arguably crucial events to world history as a whole. They are referred to in many works of fiction, and are the earliest events for which the word kamikaze, or "divine wind", is widely used. In addition, with the possible exception of the end of World War II, these failed invasion attempts are the closest Japan has ever come to being invaded within the last 1500 years or so.
 
 
The Mongol invasions of Japan of 1274 and 1281 were major events of macrohistorical importance, despite their ultimate failures. These invasion attempts are among the most famous events in Japanese history, and due to their role in setting a limit on Mongol expansion, are arguably crucial events to world history as a whole. They are referred to in many works of fiction, and are the earliest events for which the word kamikaze, or "divine wind", is widely used. In addition, with the possible exception of the end of World War II, these failed invasion attempts are the closest Japan has ever come to being invaded within the last 1500 years or so. More...

 
    Kublai Khan, Founder Yuan Dynasty
  Kublai Khan, Founder Yuan Dynasty
Kublai Khan was the fifth Khagan (Great Khan) of the Ikh Mongol Uls (Mongol Empire), reigning from 1260 to 1294, and the founder of the Yuan Dynasty, a division of the Mongol Empire. Kublai was the fourth son of Tolui and a grandson of Genghis Kha...
 
       
 
         
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