HomeAboutLogin
       
       
 
58 years

   
Ashurbanipal, Assurbanipal or Sardanapal, (reigned 669-627 BC), was the last great king of ancient Assyria. He is famous as one of the few kings in antiquity who could himself read and write. Assyrian sculpture reached its apogee under his rule. The Greeks knew him as Sardanapalos; Latin and other medieval texts refer to him as Sardanapalus. In the Bible he is called As(e)nappar or Osnapper (Ezra 4:10).

During his rule, Assyrian splendour was not only visible in its military power, but also its culture and art. Ashurbanipal created "the first systematically collected library" at Nineveh, where he gathered all cuneiform literature available by that time. A library was distinct from an archive: earlier repositories of documents had accumulated passively, in the course of administrative routine.

Tablets from the library of Nineveh preserve the most complete sources for both the Sumerian and Akkadian versions of the Epic of Gilgamesh. Other sets of tablets offer what is essentially a Sumerian-Akkadian dictionary. There are arcane astronomical/astrological texts. By far, the largest group of tablets (almost all of which are in the British Museum, London) are 'omen' texts that taught the scribes how to recognize the significance of portents.

More on this Website

 
 
Ashurbanipal, Assurbanipal or Sardanapal, (reigned 669-627 BC), was the last great king of ancient Assyria. He is famous as one of the few kings in antiquity who could himself read and write. Assyrian sculpture reached its apogee under his rule. The Greeks knew him as Sardanapalos; Latin and other medieval texts refer to him as Sardanapalus. In the Bible he is called As(e)nappar or Osnapper (Ezra 4:10).

During his rule, Assyrian splendour was not only visible in its military power, but also its culture and art. Ashurbanipal created "the first systematically collected library" at Nineveh, where he gathered all cuneiform literature available by that time. A library was distinct from an archive: earlier repositories of documents had accumulated passively, in the course of administrative routine.

Tablets from the library of Nineveh preserve the most complete sources for both the Sumerian and Akkadian versions of the Epic of Gilgamesh. Other sets of tablets offer what is essentially a Sumerian-Akkadian dictionary. There are arcane astronomical/astrological texts. By far, the largest group of tablets (almost all of which are in the British Museum, London) are 'omen' texts that taught the scribes how to recognize the significance of portents. More...

 
    Gilgamesh, King of Uruk, 1st Hero in History
  Gilgamesh, King of Uruk, 1st Hero in History
Gilgamesh is the main character in the Epic of Gilgamesh, an Akkadian poem that is considered the first great work of literature, and in earlier Sumerian poems. In the epic, Gilgamesh is a demigod of superhuman strength who builds the city walls of U...
 
    The Epic of Gilgamesh, 1st Great Work of Literature
  The Epic of Gilgamesh, 1st Great Work of Literature
Gilgamesh is one of the oldest recorded stories in the world. It tells the story of an ancient King of Uruk, Gilgamesh, who may have actually existed, and whose name is on the Sumerian King List. The story of Gilgamesh, in various Sumerian version...
 
    Cyrus The Great of Persia
  Cyrus The Great of Persia
Cyrus II of Persia, commonly known as Cyrus the Great and also called Cyrus the Elder by the Greeks, was the founder of the Achaemenid Empire. Under his rule, the empire embraced all the previous civilized states of the ancient Near East, expanded va...
 
    Austen Henry Layard, Excavator of Nimrud and Nineveh
  Austen Henry Layard, Excavator of Nimrud and Nineveh
Sir Austen Henry Layard was an English traveller, archaeologist, cuneiformist, art historian, draughtsman, collector, politician and diplomat. He is best known as the excavator of Nimrud and of Nineveh, where he uncovered a large proportion of the As...
 
       
 
         
          2019 © Timeline Index | Webwork.Amsterdam