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65 years

   
John Buchan is most famous for The Thirty-Nine Steps and Greenmantle, and his thrillers and short stories are all in print today. The list of his published books is well over a hundred in number, and only about 40 of these are fiction.

John Buchan was a polymath who was born the son of a Calvinist presbyterian minister in eastern Scotland, and died Lord Tweedsmuir, Governor-General of Canada. He was a classicist at Oxford, read for the Bar but did not practice as a barrister, was a government administrator in South Africa after the end of the Boer War, was editor of The Spectator and war correspondent for The Times, was Member of Parliament for the Scottish Universities, a Director of Reuters, a director of Thomas Nelson's, the publishing house, and was His Majesty's High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, twice. He married into the minor aristocracy, had four children and was made a Baron (lowest rung of the British hereditary peerage) on receiving the appointment of Governor-General of Canada in 1935. He was very popular in his Canadian service, travelling all over the country to meet the people and see the land, Arctic to US border, east to west, and made important political links with President Roosevelt of the United States. He died of a brain haemorrhage while shaving, shortly after signing Canada's entry into the Second World War.

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John Buchan is most famous for The Thirty-Nine Steps and Greenmantle, and his thrillers and short stories are all in print today. The list of his published books is well over a hundred in number, and only about 40 of these are fiction.

John Buchan was a polymath who was born the son of a Calvinist presbyterian minister in eastern Scotland, and died Lord Tweedsmuir, Governor-General of Canada. He was a classicist at Oxford, read for the Bar but did not practice as a barrister, was a government administrator in South Africa after the end of the Boer War, was editor of The Spectator and war correspondent for The Times, was Member of Parliament for the Scottish Universities, a Director of Reuters, a director of Thomas Nelson's, the publishing house, and was His Majesty's High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, twice. He married into the minor aristocracy, had four children and was made a Baron (lowest rung of the British hereditary peerage) on receiving the appointment of Governor-General of Canada in 1935. He was very popular in his Canadian service, travelling all over the country to meet the people and see the land, Arctic to US border, east to west, and made important political links with President Roosevelt of the United States. He died of a brain haemorrhage while shaving, shortly after signing Canada's entry into the Second World War. More...

 
    Boer War 1 and 2, South Africa
  Boer War 1 and 2, South Africa
There were two Boer wars, one in 1880-81 and the second from October 11, 1899-1902 both between the British and the settlers of Dutch origin (called Boere, Afrikaners or Voortrekkers) in South Africa that put an end to the two independent republics t...
 
       
 
         
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