HomeAboutLogin
       
       
 
64 years

   
Pierre de Fermat was a French lawyer at the Parlement of Toulouse, France, and a mathematician who is given credit for early developments that led to modern calculus. In particular, he is recognised for his discovery of an original method of finding the greatest and the smallest ordinates of curved lines, which is analogous to that of the then unknown differential calculus, as well as his research into the theory of numbers. He also made notable contributions to analytic geometry and probability. With his gift for number relations (perhaps the most outstanding since Diophantus) and his ability to find proofs for his theorems, Fermat essentially created the modern theory of numbers. The quality of his work can be gauged by the fact that many of his results were not proved for over a century after his death, and one of them, his Last Theorem, took more than three centuries to prove. It was the convention among mathematicians in his day to challenge each other, often not publishing them to retain an advantage in the competition.
 
 
Pierre de Fermat was a French lawyer at the Parlement of Toulouse, France, and a mathematician who is given credit for early developments that led to modern calculus. In particular, he is recognised for his discovery of an original method of finding the greatest and the smallest ordinates of curved lines, which is analogous to that of the then unknown differential calculus, as well as his research into the theory of numbers. He also made notable contributions to analytic geometry and probability. With his gift for number relations (perhaps the most outstanding since Diophantus) and his ability to find proofs for his theorems, Fermat essentially created the modern theory of numbers. The quality of his work can be gauged by the fact that many of his results were not proved for over a century after his death, and one of them, his Last Theorem, took more than three centuries to prove. It was the convention among mathematicians in his day to challenge each other, often not publishing them to retain an advantage in the competition. More...

 
    René Descartes, I think, therefore I am
  René Descartes, I think, therefore I am
René Descartes was a French philosopher, mathematician, physicist, and writer who spent most of his adult life in the Dutch Republic. He has been dubbed the "Father of Modern Philosophy", and much of subsequent Western philosophy is a response to his...
 
    Blaise Pascal, Inventing a Calculator
  Blaise Pascal, Inventing a Calculator
Blaise Pascal was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Catholic philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascal's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he m...
 
    Srinivasa Ramanujan, Indian Mathematician
  Srinivasa Ramanujan, Indian Mathematician
Srinivasa Ramanujan was an Indian mathematician and autodidact. Though he had almost no formal training in pure mathematics, he made extraordinary contributions to mathematical analysis, number theory, infinite series, and continued fractions. Ramanu...
 
    Louis de Broglie, French Physicist
  Louis de Broglie, French Physicist
Louis Victor Pierre Raymond de Broglie, duc de Broglie was a French physicist who made groundbreaking contributions to quantum theory. In his 1924 PhD thesis, he postulated the wave nature of electrons and suggested that all matter has wave propertie...
 
       
 
         
          2019 © Timeline Index | Webwork.Amsterdam