HomeAboutLogin
       
       
 
192 years

   
The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 after the First Crusade. It lasted less than two hundred years, until 1291 when the last remaining outpost, Acre, was destroyed by the Mamluks. At first the kingdom was little more than a loose collection of towns and cities captured during the crusade. Its first king, Godfrey of Bouillon, seems not to have called himself "king" at all; it was a subject of dispute whether Jerusalem would be a secular kingdom or theocratic state under papal authority. The secular faction was victorious, however, and the kingdom developed along the same lines as the monarchies of Western Europe, with which it had close connections, both politically and through the familial relationships of its rulers. It was, however, a relatively minor kingdom in comparison and often lacked financial and military support from Europe. The kingdom had closer ties to the neighbouring Kingdom of Armenia and the Byzantine Empire, which had an "orientalizing" influence on the western crusaders.
 
 
The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 after the First Crusade. It lasted less than two hundred years, until 1291 when the last remaining outpost, Acre, was destroyed by the Mamluks. At first the kingdom was little more than a loose collection of towns and cities captured during the crusade. Its first king, Godfrey of Bouillon, seems not to have called himself "king" at all; it was a subject of dispute whether Jerusalem would be a secular kingdom or theocratic state under papal authority. The secular faction was victorious, however, and the kingdom developed along the same lines as the monarchies of Western Europe, with which it had close connections, both politically and through the familial relationships of its rulers. It was, however, a relatively minor kingdom in comparison and often lacked financial and military support from Europe. The kingdom had closer ties to the neighbouring Kingdom of Armenia and the Byzantine Empire, which had an "orientalizing" influence on the western crusaders. More...

 
    Raymond IV of Toulouse, 1st Crusade
  Raymond IV of Toulouse, 1st Crusade
Raymond IV of Toulouse sometimes called Raymond of St Gilles was Count of Toulouse, Duke of Narbonne, and Margrave of Provence and one of the leaders of the First Crusade. He was a son of Pons of Toulouse and Almodis de La Marche. He received Saint-G...
 
    William II of England
  William II of England
William II, the third son of William I of England (William the Conqueror), was King of England from 1087 until 1100, with powers over Normandy, and influence in Scotland. He was less successful in extending control into Wales. William is commonly kno...
 
    Bohemond I of Antioch, Leader 1st Crusade
  Bohemond I of Antioch, Leader 1st Crusade
Bohemond I, Prince of Taranto and Prince of Antioch, was one of the leaders of the First Crusade. The Crusade had no outright military leader, but instead was ruled by a committee of nobles. Bohemond was one of the most important of these leaders. Bo...
 
    Baldwin I of Jerusalem, Leader 1st Crusade
  Baldwin I of Jerusalem, Leader 1st Crusade
Baldwin I of Jerusalem, was one of the leaders of the First Crusade, who became the first Count of Edessa and then the second ruler and first titled King of Jerusalem. He was the brother of Godfrey of Bouillon, who was the first ruler of the crusader...
 
    Godfrey of Bouillon, Leader 1st Crusade
  Godfrey of Bouillon, Leader 1st Crusade
Godfrey of Bouillon was a leader of the First Crusade. He was either the eldest or the second son of Eustace II, Count of Boulogne, and Ida, daughter of Godfrey III, Duke of Lower Lorraine. He was designated by his uncle, Godfrey the Hunchback, as hi...
 
    The Crusades
  The Crusades
The Crusades were a series of religiously-sanctioned military campaigns waged by much of Latin Christian Europe, particularly the Franks of France and the Holy Roman Empire. The specific crusades to restore Christian control of the Holy Land were fou...
 
    Siege of Jerusalem, 1st Crusade
  Siege of Jerusalem, 1st Crusade
In the early 11th century, the Egyptian Fatimid Caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah ordered the destruction of all churches and synagogues in Jerusalem. Reports of this were one cause of the First Crusade, which marched off from Europe to the area, and, on...
 
    The Knights Hospitaller, Order of St. John
  The Knights Hospitaller, Order of St. John
The Knights Hospitaller (also known as the Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta, Order of St. John, Knights of Malta, and Chevaliers of Malta; French: Ordre des Hospitaliers) is a Christian organization...
 
    Knights Templar
  Knights Templar
The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon, commonly known as the Knights Templar or the Order of the Temple, were among the most famous of the Western Christian military orders. The organization existed for approximately two cen...
 
    Order of the Teutonic Knights
  Order of the Teutonic Knights
The Order of the Teutonic Knights of St. Mary's Hospital in Jerusalem, is a German Roman Catholic religious order. It was formed to aid Catholics on their pilgrimages to the Holy Land and to establish hospitals to care for the sick and injured. Its m...
 
    Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor
  Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor
Frederick II of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was a pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212 and unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215. As such, he was King of Germany, of Italy, and of Burgundy. He was Holy Roman Emperor from his pap...
 
       
 
         
          2019 © Timeline Index | Webwork.Amsterdam