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Pope Clement XIII, born Carlo della Torre di Rezzonico, was Pope from 16 July 1758 to his death in 1769.

His pontificate was overshadowed by the pressure to suppress the Jesuits. He proved to be their greatest defender at that time.

Clement XIII warmly espoused the Jesuit order in a papal bull Apostolicum pascendi, 7 January 1765, which dismissed criticisms of the Jesuits as calumnies and praised the order's usefulness; it was largely ignored: by 1768 the Jesuits had been expelled from France, the Two Sicilies and Parma. In Spain, they appeared to be safe, but Charles III of Spain (175988), aware of the drawn-out contentions in Bourbon France, decided on a more peremptory efficiency. During the night of 23 April 1767, all the Jesuit houses of Spain were suddenly surrounded, the inhabitants arrested, shipped to the ports in the clothes they were wearing and bundled onto ships for Civitavecchia. The King's letter to Clement XIII promised that his allowance of 100 piastres each year would be withdrawn for the whole order, should any one of them venture at any time to write anything in self-defence or in criticism of the motives for the expulsion, motives that he refused to discuss, then or in the future.

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Pope Clement XIII, born Carlo della Torre di Rezzonico, was Pope from 16 July 1758 to his death in 1769.

His pontificate was overshadowed by the pressure to suppress the Jesuits. He proved to be their greatest defender at that time.

Clement XIII warmly espoused the Jesuit order in a papal bull Apostolicum pascendi, 7 January 1765, which dismissed criticisms of the Jesuits as calumnies and praised the order's usefulness; it was largely ignored: by 1768 the Jesuits had been expelled from France, the Two Sicilies and Parma. In Spain, they appeared to be safe, but Charles III of Spain (175988), aware of the drawn-out contentions in Bourbon France, decided on a more peremptory efficiency. During the night of 23 April 1767, all the Jesuit houses of Spain were suddenly surrounded, the inhabitants arrested, shipped to the ports in the clothes they were wearing and bundled onto ships for Civitavecchia. The King's letter to Clement XIII promised that his allowance of 100 piastres each year would be withdrawn for the whole order, should any one of them venture at any time to write anything in self-defence or in criticism of the motives for the expulsion, motives that he refused to discuss, then or in the future. More

 
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