HomeAboutLoginWidgets
       
     

Europe

 
 

    Europe  new window
Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. Physically and geologically, Europe is a subcontinent or large peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. Europe is bounded to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the west by the Atlantic Ocean and to the south by the Mediterranean and the Caucasus. Europe's boundary to the east is vague, but has traditionally been given as the Ural Mountains and Caspian Sea to the southeast: the Urals are considered by most to be a geographical and tectonic landmark separating Asia from Europe.

Europe is the world's second-smallest continent in terms of area, covering around 10 million km² or 2.0% of the Earth's surface, and is only larger than Australia. In terms of population, it is the third-largest continent (Asia and Africa are larger) with a population of more than 700 million, or about 11% of the world's population.

More on this Website  >  new window
• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe

Related LinksAdd URL  >  new window
YouTube: Watch as 1000 years of European borders cEdit

 
 
Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. Physically and geologically, Europe is a subcontinent or large peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. Europe is bounded to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the west by the Atlantic Ocean and to the south by the Mediterranean and the Caucasus. Europe's boundary to the east is vague, but has traditionally been given as the Ural Mountains and Caspian Sea to the southeast: the Urals are considered by most to be a geographical and tectonic landmark separating Asia from Europe.

Europe is the world's second-smallest continent in terms of area, covering around 10 million km² or 2.0% of the Earth's surface, and is only larger than Australia. In terms of population, it is the third-largest continent (Asia and Africa are larger) with a population of more than 700 million, or about 11% of the world's population. More new window

 
    Earth, 3rd Planet from the Sun
  Earth, 3rd Planet from the Sun
Earth is the third planet from the Sun. It is the densest and fifth-largest of the eight planets in the Solar System. It is also the largest of the Solar System's four terrestrial planets. It is sometimes referred to as the world or the Blue Planet....
 
    BRONZE AGE :  First Writing
  BRONZE AGE : First Writing
The Bronze Age is a time period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze-Iron system, as proposed in modern times...
 
    Stonehenge
  Stonehenge
Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in the English county of Wiltshire, about 3.2 kilometres (2.0 mi) west of Amesbury and 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) north of Salisbury. One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is composed of earthw...
 
    IRON AGE : Start of the Trojan War
  IRON AGE : Start of the Trojan War
The Iron Age is the period generally occurring after the Bronze Age, marked by the prevalent use of iron. The early period of the age is characterized by the widespread use of iron or steel. The adoption of these materials coincided with other cha...
 
    The Trojan War, Troy
  The Trojan War, Troy
In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy stole Helen from her husband Menelaus, the king of Sparta. The war is among the most important events in Greek mythology and was narrat...
 
    Homer, Greek Poet
  Homer, Greek Poet
No one is exactly sure who Homer was.  Theories abound, and some even think he never existed.  Regardless, he is traditionally recognized as the original creator of two epic poems, the Iliad and the Odyssey.  Living sometime in the second half of the...
 
    First Olympic Games
  First Olympic Games
According to historical records, the first ancient Olympic Games can be traced back to 776 BC. They were dedicated to the Olympian gods and were staged on the ancient plains of Olympia. They continued for nearly 12 centuries, until Emperor Theodosius...
 
    Rome, The Eternal City
  Rome, The Eternal City
Rome's history spans more than two and a half thousand years, since its legendary founding in 753 BC. Rome is one of the oldest continuously occupied cities in Europe. It is referred to as "The Eternal City" (Latin: Roma Aeterna), a central notion in...
 
    Solon, Founder of Democracy
  Solon, Founder of Democracy
Solon was an Athenian statesman, lawmaker, and elegiac poet. He is remembered particularly for his efforts to legislate against political, economic and moral decline in archaic Athens. His reforms failed in the short term yet he is often credited wit...
 
    Pythagoras of Samos
  Pythagoras of Samos
Pythagoras of Samos was an Ionian Greek philosopher, mathematician, and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism. Most of the information about Pythagoras was written down centuries after he lived, so very little reliable information i...
 
    Leonidas, King of Sparta
  Leonidas, King of Sparta
Leonidas was a king of Sparta, the 17th of the Agiad line, one of the sons of King Anaxandridas II of Sparta, who was believed in mythology to be a descendant of Heracles, possessing much of the latter's strength and bravery. While it has been establ...
 
    The Greco-Persian Wars
  The Greco-Persian Wars
The Greco-Persian Wars (also often called the Persian Wars) were a series of conflicts between the Achaemenid Empire of Persia and city-states of the Hellenic world that started in 499 BC and lasted until 449 BC. The collision between the fractious p...
 
    Sophocles, Greek Playwright
  Sophocles, Greek Playwright
Born in 495 B.C. about a mile northwest of Athens, Sophocles was to become one of the great playwrights of the golden age. The son of a wealthy merchant, he would enjoy all the comforts of a thriving Greek empire. He studied all of the arts. By the a...
 
    Battle of Marathon
  Battle of Marathon
In 490 B.C., 25,000 Persians under Darius landed on the Plain of Marathon. The Spartans were unwilling to provide help for the Athenians in time, so with the help of 1,000 Plataeans, and led by Callimachus and Miltiades, Athens' army of about one thi...
 
    Herodotus, Father of History
  Herodotus, Father of History
Herodotus of Halicarnassus was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC in Halicarnassus, Caria; Bodrum in modern Turkey. He is regarded as the "Father of History" in Western culture. He was the first historian known to collect his materials...
 
    Socrates, Greek Philosopher
  Socrates, Greek Philosopher
Socrates was a classical Greek Athenian philosopher. Credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, he is an enigmatic figure known chiefly through the accounts of later classical writers, especially the writings of his students Plato and Xen...
 
    Aristotle, Greek Philosopher
  Aristotle, Greek Philosopher
He studied (367-347 B.C.) under Plato and later (342-339 B.C.) tutored Alexander the Great at the Macedonian court. In 335 B.C. he opened a school in the Athenian Lyceum. During the anti-Macedonian agitation after Alexander's death Aristotle fled (32...
 
    Alexander the Great
  Alexander the Great
Alexander III of Macedon, commonly known as Alexander the Great, was a king of Macedon, a state in the north eastern region of Greece, and by the age of thirty was the creator of one of the largest empires in ancient history, stretching from the Ioni...
 
    HELLENISTIC PERIOD
  HELLENISTIC PERIOD
The Hellenistic period is the period of ancient Greek and eastern Mediterranean history between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire as signified by the Battle of Actium in 31 BC and the subsequent conquest...
 
    Archimedes of Syracuse, Eureka!
  Archimedes of Syracuse, Eureka!
One of the most original thinkers of Antiquity was Archimedes of Syracuse. Because our approach to physics is based upon a model that was developed by this scientist, we immediately recognize him as 'on of us'. And indeed: he did all kinds of experim...
 
    Hannibal, General of Carthage
  Hannibal, General of Carthage
Hannibal was a Carthaginian military commander and tactician who is popularly credited as one of the most talented commanders in history. His father Hamilcar Barca was the leading Carthaginian commander during the First Punic War, his younger brother...
 
    Punic War 3 : Destruction of Carthage
  Punic War 3 : Destruction of Carthage
In the 3d century B.C. Rome challenged Carthage’s control of the W Mediterranean in the Punic Wars (so called after the Roman name for the Carthaginians, Poeni, i.e., Phoenicians). The First Punic War (264–241) cost Carthage all remaining ho...
 
    Cicero, Roman Philosopher
  Cicero, Roman Philosopher
Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer, orator, political theorist, consul and constitutionalist. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is widely considered one of Rome's greatest orator...
 
    Julius Caesar
  Julius Caesar
Gaius Julius Caesar is remembered as one of history's greatest generals and a key ruler of the Roman empire. As a young man he rose through the administrative ranks of the Roman republic, accumulating power until he was elected consul in 59 B.C. Over...
 
    Augustus, (Octavius) 1st Roman Emperor
  Augustus, (Octavius) 1st Roman Emperor
Emperor Augustus of Rome was born with the given name Gaius Octavius on September 23, 63 B.C. He took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (Octavian) in 44 B.C. after the murder of his great uncle, Julius Caesar. In his will Caesar had adopted Oct...
 
    ROMAN PERIOD
  ROMAN PERIOD
The Roman Empire was the post-Republican period of the ancient Roman civilisation, characterised by an autocratic form of government, headed by an Emperor, and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa, the Middle East...
 
    Pompeii and Herculaneum Ruined
  Pompeii and Herculaneum Ruined
Pompeii is a ruined and partially buried Roman town-city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Along with Herculaneum, its sister city, Pompeii was destroyed, and completely buried, during a l...
 
    Hadrian's Wall
  Hadrian's Wall
One of the greatest monuments to the power - and limitations - of the Roman Empire, Hadrian's Wall ran for 73 miles across open country. By the time Hadrian became Emperor in 117 AD the Roman Empire had ceased to expand. Hadrian was concerned t...
 
    The Goths, Invasions of the Roman Empire
  The Goths, Invasions of the Roman Empire
The Goths were an East Germanic tribe which according to their own traditions originated in Scandinavia (specifically Götaland and Gotland). They migrated southwards and conquered parts of the Roman empire. A force of Goths launched one of the fir...
 
    Constantine I, Founder Constantinople
  Constantine I, Founder Constantinople
Constantine I, The Great was the 57th Emperor of the Roman Empire from 306, and the sole holder of that office from 324 until his death in 337. Best known for being the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine reversed the persecutions of his prede...
 
    Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo
  Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo
He was named the Christian bishop of Hippo (Annaba, Algeria) in 396, and devoted the remaining decades of his life to the formation of an ascetic religious community. Augustine argued against the skeptics that genuine human knowledge can be establish...
 
    Attila, King of the Huns
  Attila, King of the Huns
Attila the Hun was the Emperor of the Huns from 434 until his death in 453. He was leader of the Hunnic Empire which stretched from Germany to the Ural River and from the River Danube to the Baltic Sea. During his rule, he was one of the most fearsom...
 
    MIDDLE AGES
  MIDDLE AGES
The Middle Ages was the middle period in a schematic division of European history into three 'ages': Classical civilization, the Middle Ages, and Modern Civilization. It is commonly considered as having lasted from the end of the Western Roman Empire...
 
    Saint Benedict
  Saint Benedict
Saint Benedict of Nursia is a Christian saint, honored by the Roman Catholic Church as the patron saint of Europe and students. Benedict founded twelve communities for monks at Subiaco, about 40 miles (64 km) to the east of Rome, before moving to Mon...
 
    Justinian I, East Roman Emperor
  Justinian I, East Roman Emperor
Justinian I, commonly known as Justinian the Great, was East Roman (Byzantine) Emperor from 527 to 565. During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the classical Roman Empire. One of the...
 
    Battle of Tours, Turning Point Islam
  Battle of Tours, Turning Point Islam
The Battle of Tours, often called Battle of Poitiers, was fought near the city of Tours, close to the border between the Frankish realm and the independent region of Aquitaine. The battle pitted Frankish and Burgundian forces under Austrasian Mayor o...
 
    Charlemagne, Charles I the Great
  Charlemagne, Charles I the Great
Charlemagne, meaning Charles the Great, was King of the Franks from 768 and Emperor of the Romans (Imperator Romanorum) from 800 to his death in 814. He expanded the Frankish kingdom into an empire that incorporated much of Western and Central Europe...
 
    Battle of Hastings, William the Conqueror
  Battle of Hastings, William the Conqueror
William took seven months to prepare his invasion force, using some 600 transport ships to carry around 7,000 men (including 2,000-3,000 cavalry) across the Channel. On 28 September 1066, with a favourable wind, William landed unopposed at Pevensey a...
 
    The Crusades
  The Crusades
The Crusades were a series of religiously-sanctioned military campaigns waged by much of Latin Christian Europe, particularly the Franks of France and the Holy Roman Empire. The specific crusades to restore Christian control of the Holy Land were fou...
 
    Genghis Khan, Unified the Mongols
  Genghis Khan, Unified the Mongols
Genghis Khan was the founder and Great Khan (emperor) of the Mongol Empire, which became the largest contiguous empire in history after his demise. He came to power by uniting many of the nomadic tribes of northeast Asia. After founding the Mongol...
 
    Marco Polo, Travels to China
  Marco Polo, Travels to China
Marco Polo was a Christian merchant from the Venetian Republic whose travels are recorded in Il Milione, a book which did much to introduce Europeans to Central Asia and China. He learned about trading whilst his father and uncle, Niccolò and Maffeo,...
 
    The Black Death in Europe
  The Black Death in Europe
Coming out of the East, the Black Death reached the shores of Italy in the spring of 1348 unleashing a rampage of death across Europe unprecedented in recorded history. By the time the epidemic played itself out three years later, anywhere between 25...
 
    RENAISSANCE
  RENAISSANCE
The Renaissance (from French: Renaissance "re-birth", Italian: Rinascimento, from rinascere "to be reborn") was a cultural movement that spanned the period roughly from the 14th to the 17th century, beginning in Italy in the Late Middle Ages and late...
 
    Gutenberg, Inventor Movable Type - 1439
  Gutenberg, Inventor Movable Type - 1439
Johannes Gutenberg was a German blacksmith, goldsmith, printer, and publisher who introduced modern book printing. His invention of mechanical movable type printing started the Printing Revolution and is widely regarded as the most important event of...
 
    Columbus, Discovers America - 1492
  Columbus, Discovers America - 1492
Christopher Columbus was an explorer, colonizer, and navigator, born in the Republic of Genoa, in northwestern Italy. Under the auspices of the Catholic Monarchs of Spain, he completed four voyages across the Atlantic Ocean that led to general Europe...
 
    Isabella, Queen of Spain
  Isabella, Queen of Spain
Isabella I was Queen of Castile and León. She and her husband Ferdinand II of Aragon brought stability to both kingdoms that became the basis for the unification of Spain. Later the two laid the foundations for the political unification of Spain unde...
 
    Leonardo da Vinci, Renaissance Man
  Leonardo da Vinci, Renaissance Man
Leonardo da Vinci was an Italian Renaissance polymath: painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. His genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitom...
 
    The Fall of Constantinople
  The Fall of Constantinople
The Fall of Constantinople was the capture of the capital of the Byzantine Empire which occurred after a siege laid by the Ottoman Empire, under the command of Sultan Mehmed II. The siege lasted from Thursday, 5 April 1453 until Tuesday, 29 May 1453...
 
    Desiderius Erasmus, Humanist
  Desiderius Erasmus, Humanist
Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam was a Dutch humanist and theologian. Erasmus was a classical scholar who wrote in a "pure" Latin style. Although Erasmus remained a Roman Catholic throughout his lifetime, he harshly criticised what he considered exces...
 
    Vasco Da Gama, Sails to India - 1498
  Vasco Da Gama, Sails to India - 1498
Vasco da Gama is famous for his completion of the first all water trade route between Europe and India. Da Gama’s father, Estavao, had originally been chosen by King Joao II to make this historic voyage, but he died before he could complete the miss...
 
    Copernicus, Earth moves around the Sun
  Copernicus, Earth moves around the Sun
Nicolaus Copernicus was the first astronomer to formulate a comprehensive heliocentric cosmology, which displaced the Earth from the center of the universe. His epochal book, De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Sp...
 
    Michelangelo Buonarroti
  Michelangelo Buonarroti
Michelangelo Buonarroti was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect, poet, and engineer of the High Renaissance who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art. Despite making few forays beyond the arts, his versatility in the...
 
    Magellan, Circled the Globe - 1521
  Magellan, Circled the Globe - 1521
Ferdinand Magellan was a Portuguese sea explorer who sailed for both Portugal and Spain. He was the first to sail from Europe westwards to Asia, the first European to sail the Pacific Ocean, and the first to lead an expedition for the purpose of circ...
 
    Martin Luther
  Martin Luther
Martin Luther was a German priest and professor of theology who initiated the Protestant Reformation. Strongly disputing the claim that freedom from God's punishment of sin could be purchased with money, he confronted indulgence salesman Johann Tetz...
 
    Cortés, Conqueror of Mexico - 1519
  Cortés, Conqueror of Mexico - 1519
Hernán Cortés de Monroy y Pizarro, 1st Marquis of the Valley of Oaxaca was a Spanish Conquistador who led an expedition that caused the fall of the Aztec Empire and brought large portions of mainland Mexico under the rule of the King of Castile in th...
 
    Columbus Discovers America
  Columbus Discovers America
After little over a month at sea, Columbus' ships sighted land in what is now known as the Bahamas. The ship's recorder entered in his journal on Thursday, October 11, 1492, the following: At two hours after midnight the land was sighted at a...
 
    Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
  Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
Charles V was Holy Roman Emperor from 1519-1558; he was also King of Spain from 1516-1556, officially as Charles I of Spain, although often referred to as Charles V ("Carlos Quinto" or "Carlos V") in Spain and Latin America. He was the son of Philip...
 
    John Calvin, Theologian
  John Calvin, Theologian
John Calvin was an influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism. Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he sudden...
 
    REFORMATION
  REFORMATION
The Protestant Reformation was the schism within Western Christianity initiated by Martin Luther, John Calvin, and other early Protestants. Although there had been significant attempts at reform before Luther (notably those of John Wycliffe and Jan H...
 
    Philip II of Spain
  Philip II of Spain
Philip II, king of Spain and Portugal, was born at Valladolid, the only son of the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V and Isabella of Portugal. Philip II, the self-proclaimed leader of Counter-Reformation, assumed the throne in 1556 with a great deal of p...
 
    Elizabeth I, Queen of England
  Elizabeth I, Queen of England
Elizabeth I was born in 1533 to Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. Although she entertained many marriage proposals and flirted incessantly, she never married or had children. Elizabeth, the last of the Tudors, died at seventy years of age after a very succ...
 
    Sir Francis Drake
  Sir Francis Drake
Sir Francis Drake, Vice Admiral was an English sea captain, privateer, navigator, slaver, a renowned pirate, and a politician of the Elizabethan era. Elizabeth I of England awarded Drake a knighthood in 1581. He was second-in-command of the English f...
 
    The Council of Trent
  The Council of Trent
The Council of Trent is reckoned by the Roman Catholic Church to be the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the universal church. It was held from December 13, 1545, to December 4, 1563 in the Italian city of Trent. Although called an Ecumenical Council...
 
    William Shakespeare
  William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". His extant works,...
 
    René Descartes, French Philosopher
  René Descartes, French Philosopher
René Descartes was a French philosopher, mathematician, physicist, and writer who spent most of his adult life in the Dutch Republic. He has been dubbed the "Father of Modern Philosophy", and much of subsequent Western philosophy is a response to his...
 
    Oliver Cromwell, Commonwealth of England
  Oliver Cromwell, Commonwealth of England
Oliver Cromwell was an English military and political leader and later Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland. Cromwell was one of the signatories of King Charles I's death warrant in 1649, and, as a member of the Rump...
 
    ENLIGHTENMENT, The Age of Reason
  ENLIGHTENMENT, The Age of Reason
The Age of Enlightenment was an intellectual movement in 18th-century Europe. The goal of the Enlightenment was to establish an authoritative ethics, aesthetics, and knowledge based on an "enlightened" rationality. The movement's leaders viewed thems...
 
    Stuyvesant, Governor New York - 1646
  Stuyvesant, Governor New York - 1646
Peter Stuyvesant, Dutch Governor of New York (the New Netherlands). Born in Holland in 1602; died in New York city in August, 1672. He was the son of a clergyman of Friesland, and at an early age displayed a fondness for military life. He served in t...
 
    Rembrandt Van Rijn
  Rembrandt Van Rijn
Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn was a Dutch painter and etcher. He is generally considered one of the greatest painters and printmakers in European art history and the most important in Dutch history. His contributions to art came in a period of great...
 
    Battle of Vienna
  Battle of Vienna
The Battle of Vienna (as distinct from the Siege of Vienna in 1529) took place on September 11 and September 12 1683 after Vienna had been besieged by Turks for two months. It was the first large-scale battle of the Habsburg-Ottoman Wars, yet with th...
 
    Johann Sebastian Bach
  Johann Sebastian Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate mat...
 
    Voltaire, Author and Philosopher
  Voltaire, Author and Philosopher
François-Marie Arouet, better known by the pen name Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer and philosopher famous for his wit and for his advocacy of civil liberties, including freedom of religion and free trade. Voltaire was a prolific writer...
 
    Adam Smith, Economist
  Adam Smith, Economist
Smith moved to London in 1776, where he published "An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations," which examined in detail the consequences of economic freedom. It covered such concepts as the role of self-interest, the division of...
 
    Captain James Cook
  Captain James Cook
Captain James Cook was a British explorer, navigator and cartographer, ultimately rising to the rank of Captain in the Royal Navy. Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean during which he achieved the...
 
    INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
  INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
The Industrial Revolution was a period of the 18th century marked by social and technological change in which manufacturing began to rely on steam power, fueled primarily by coal, rather than on animal labor, or on water or wind power; and by a shift...
 
    Marie Antoinette, Guillotined 1793
  Marie Antoinette, Guillotined 1793
Marie Antoinette was Queen Consort of France. Daughter of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria of the Habsburg dynasty and her consort, the Emperor Francis I, she was married to the heir to the French throne (later Louis XVI of France) in order to confir...
 
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
He showed musical gifts at a very early age, composing when he was five and when he was six playing before the Bavarian elector and the Austrian empress. Leopold felt that it was proper, and might also be profitable, to exhibit his children's God-giv...
 
    Horatio Nelson, Admiral
  Horatio Nelson, Admiral
200 years after his death, Horatio Nelson is still Britain's most popular hero. Nelson's great victories at the Nile (1 August 1798) and Copenhagen (2 April 1801) made him an international hero in his own lifetime. He was mobbed in the streets, lik...
 
    Napoleon Bonaparte, Emperor of the French
  Napoleon Bonaparte, Emperor of the French
Napoleon Bonaparte was a French military and political leader who rose to prominence during the latter stages of the French Revolution and its associated wars in Europe. As Napoleon I, he was Emperor of the French from 1804 to 1814 and again in 18...
 
    Ludwig Van Beethoven
  Ludwig Van Beethoven
Ludwig Van Beethoven is certainly on any short list of the greatest composers. Like all supreme artists, this is not for his prodigioustechnical gifts alone, but for the depth of human experience and emotion that his music explores and the universali...
 
    The American Revolutionary War
  The American Revolutionary War
The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) or American War of Independence, or simply Revolutionary War, began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and thirteen British colonies in North America, and ended in a global war between several Eur...
 
    Lord Byron, Poet
  Lord Byron, Poet
George Gordon Noel Byron, 6th Baron Byron, was among the most famous of the English 'Romantic' poets; his contemporaries included Percy Shelley and John Keats. He was also a satirist whose poetry and personality captured the imagination of Europe....
 
    The French Revolution
  The French Revolution
The French Revolution was a period of radical social and political upheaval in France from 1789 to 1799 that profoundly affected French and modern history, marking the decline of powerful monarchies and churches and the rise of democracy and national...
 
    Charles Darwin, Evolution Theory - 1859
  Charles Darwin, Evolution Theory - 1859
Charles Robert Darwin was an English naturalist who realised and presented compelling evidence that all species of life have evolved over time from common ancestors, through the process he called natural selection. The fact that evolution occurs beca...
 
    Greek War of Independence
  Greek War of Independence
The Greek War of Independence, also commonly known as the Greek Revolution, was a successful war waged by the Greeks to win independence for Greece from the Ottoman Empire. After a long and bloody struggle, and with the aid of the Great Powers, indep...
 
    Vincent van Gogh, Post-Impressionists
  Vincent van Gogh, Post-Impressionists
One of the four great Post-impressionists (along with Paul Gauguin, Georges Seurat, and Paul Cézanne), Vincent van Gogh is generally considered the greatest Dutch painter after Rembrandt. His reputation is based largely on the works of the last three...
 
    2nd Italian War of Independence
  2nd Italian War of Independence
The Second War of Italian Independence, Franco-Austrian War, or Austro-Sardinian War was fought by Napoleon III of France and the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia against the Austrian Empire in 1859. In respect to the Italian unification process, this wa...
 
    Nicholas II, Last Russian Tsar
  Nicholas II, Last Russian Tsar
Nicholas II, the last Russian Emperor, was the eldest son of Alexander III. He ascended the throne after the death of his father in 1894, and was crowned on May 14, 1896. The ceremony in Moscow was overshadowed by a catastrophe on Khodynskoe Field, w...
 
    Lenin, Founder of the Soviet Republics
  Lenin, Founder of the Soviet Republics
Lenin was the founder and guiding spirit of the Soviet Republics and the Communist International, the disciple of Marx, the leader of the Bolshevik party and the organizer of the Oct. revolution in Russia, was born on April 9 (22), 1870, in the town...
 
    Sir Winston Churchill
  Sir Winston Churchill
Winston Churchill was a politician, a soldier, an artist, and the 20th century's most famous and celebrated Prime Minister. His father was Lord Randolph Churchill, a Nineteenth Century Tory politician. He was educated at Harrow and at Sandhurst Royal...
 
    Albert Einstein, Relativity Theory - 1905
  Albert Einstein, Relativity Theory - 1905
Einstein's contributions to physics began in 1905 with three major results: the explanation of Brownian motion in terms of molecules; the explanation of the photoelectric effect in terms of the quantum; and the special theory of relativity that links...
 
    Joseph Stalin
  Joseph Stalin
Joseph Stalin was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union's Central Committee from 1922 until 1953. Stalin's increasing control of the Party from 1928 onwards led to him becoming the de facto party leader and the dictator of his...
 
    Benito Mussolini
  Benito Mussolini
Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini ruled Italy as a dictator from 1922 to 1943. He created a fascist state through the use of state terror and propaganda. Using his charisma, total control of the media and intimidation of political rivals, he disassemb...
 
    Adolf Hitler, Der Führer
  Adolf Hitler, Der Führer
Adolf Hitler was an Austrian-born German politician and the leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, abbreviated NSDAP), commonly known as the Nazi Party. He was Chancellor of Germ...
 
    The Eiffel Tower, Paris
  The Eiffel Tower, Paris
The plan to build a tower 300 metres high was conceived as part of preparations for the World's Fair of 1889. Emile Nouguier and Maurice Koechlin, the two chief engineers in Eiffel's company, had the idea for a very tall tower in June 1884. It was to...
 
    Generalísimo Francisco Franco
  Generalísimo Francisco Franco
Generalísimo Francisco Franco, was head of state of Spain from 1939 until his death in 1975. Known as "El Caudillo de España" ("the leader"), he presided over the fascist authoritarian government of the Spanish State following victory in the Spanish...
 
    20th CENTURY
  20th CENTURY
The twentieth century was remarkable due to the technological, medical, social, ideological, and international innovations, and due to the rise of war, genocide, and democide on an unprecedented scale. The trends of mechanization of goods & services...
 
    World War I, WW1
  World War I, WW1
World War I (WWI), also called the First World War or Great War, was a major war centered in Europe that began in the summer of 1914 and lasted until November 1918. It involved all of the world's great powers, which were assembled in two opposing all...
 
    Murder of Franz Ferdinand : Start WW1
  Murder of Franz Ferdinand : Start WW1
World War I started with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austria- Hungarian throne, in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914 by a member of the Black Hand, a Serbian nationalist secret society. Austria-Hungary's reaction to the dea...
 
    The Russian Revolution of 1917
  The Russian Revolution of 1917
The Bolshevik Revolution in Russia in 1917 was initiated by millions of people who would change the history of the world as we know it. When Czar Nicholas II dragged 11 million peasants into World War I, the Russian people became discouraged with the...
 
    Spanish Civil War
  Spanish Civil War
The Spanish Civil War was the result of complex political differences between the Republicans — supporters of the government of the day, the Second Spanish Republic, mostly subscribing to electoral democracy and ranging from centrists to those advoca...
 
    World War 2, WW2
  World War 2, WW2
World War 2 started when Germany invaded Poland without warning at 4.45am on the 1st September 1939. By the evening of the 3rd September, Britain and France were at war with Germany and within a week, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and South Africa h...
 
    Timeline of the Holocaust
  Timeline of the Holocaust
The Simon Wiesenthal Center is an international Jewish human rights organization dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust by fostering tolerance and understanding through community involvement, educational outreach and social action. The C...
 
    The European Union, EU
  The European Union, EU
The European Union (EU) is a family of democratic European countries, committed to working together for peace and prosperity. It is not a State intended to replace existing states, but it is more than any other international organisation. The EU is,...
 
    The Beatles
  The Beatles
1961, February 9 - On this date the group makes their first lunchtime debut as The Beatles for a session at the Cavern. March 21 - The Beatles first night-time appearance at the Cavern. The band gets paid a mere $42.00 per night. Recalls Gerry Marsd...
 
    The Munich Massacre, Munich Olympics
  The Munich Massacre, Munich Olympics
It was 4:30 in the morning on Sept. 5, 1972, when five Arab terrorists wearing track sweat suits climbed the six-foot six-inch fence surrounding the Olympic Village. Although they were seen by several people, no one thought anything was unusual since...
 
    Chernobyl, Nuclear Power Accident
  Chernobyl, Nuclear Power Accident
The disaster that occured at a nuclear power plant in Chernobyl in the former USSR (now Ukraine) plant on April 25th 1986 is an example of the devastation that can occur when a nuclear reaction goes wrong. The Chernobyl nuclear power plant located 80...
 
    The Fall of The Berlin Wall
  The Fall of The Berlin Wall
On 9th November, at 18.57 hours, Günter Schabowski, head of the Berlin SED and an influential member of the outgoing Politburo, announced to bemused journalists that the Council of Ministers had just decided to allow East Germans to move...
 
     

Europe

 
         



 
 
         
          © 2003-2014 Timeline Index