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Charlemagne, Charles I the Great

 
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Charlemagne, meaning Charles the Great, was King of the Franks from 768 and Emperor of the Romans (Imperator Romanorum) from 800 to his death in 814. He expanded the Frankish kingdom into an empire that incorporated much of Western and Central Europe. During his reign, he conquered Italy and was crowned Imperator Augustus by Pope Leo III on 25 December 800. His rule is also associated with the Carolingian Renaissance, a revival of art, religion, and culture through the medium of the Catholic Church. Through his foreign conquests and internal reforms, Charlemagne helped define both Western Europe and the European Middle Ages. He is numbered as Charles I in the regnal lists of Germany, the Holy Roman Empire, and France.
 
 
         
    The Lombards invade Italy
  The Lombards invade Italy
The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, Longobards found in older English texts), were Germanic people who migrated southwards to occupy the Hungarian plains during the 6th century and entered the late Roman Empire. Pressure from the Avars caused them to...
 
    Charles Martel, The Hammer
  Charles Martel, The Hammer
Charles Martel also known as Charles the Hammer, was a Frankish military and political leader, who served as Mayor of the Palace under the Merovingian kings and ruled de facto during an interregnum (73743) at the end of his life, using the title Duk...
 
    Pepin the Short, Father of Charlemagne
  Pepin the Short, Father of Charlemagne
Pepin the Short (or Pepin the Younger or Pepin III), was the King of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. He was born in 714 in Jupille, close to the city of Liège, in what is today B...
 
    Alcuin, Minister of Charlemagne
  Alcuin, Minister of Charlemagne
Alcuin of York was an English scholar, ecclesiastic, poet and teacher from York, Northumbria. He was born around 735 and became the student of Archbishop Ecgbert at York. At the invitation of Charlemagne, he became a leading scholar and teacher at th...
 
    Irene of Athens, Byzantine Empress
  Irene of Athens, Byzantine Empress
Irene of Athens, Byzantine empress (797-802). She served (780-90) as regent for her son, Constantine VI, and later was made (792) joint ruler. Devoted to the Orthodox Church, she bent most of her efforts to suppressing iconoclasm. In 797 Irene had he...
 
    Offa, First King of the English
  Offa, First King of the English
Offa (son of Thingfrith, son of Eanulf), King of Mercia, was one of the leading figures of Saxon history. He obtained the throne of Mercia in 757, after the murder of his cousin, King Aethelbald, by Beornraed. After spending fourteen years in consoli...
 
    Roland, Charlemagne's Commander
  Roland, Charlemagne's Commander
Roland, the great French hero of the medieval Charlemagne cycle of chansons de geste, immortalized in the Chanson de Roland (11th or 12th cent.). Existence of an early Roland poem is indicated by the historian Wace's statement that Taillefer sang of...
 
    The Viking Age
  The Viking Age
The Vikings were venturesome seafarers. From Denmark, Norway and Sweden they spread through Europe and the North Atlantic in the period of vigorous Scandinavian expansion (AD 800-1050) known as the Viking Age. Although they are often thought of prima...
 
    Pope St. Leo III, Crowned Charlemagne
  Pope St. Leo III, Crowned Charlemagne
Leo III, Saint, pope (795816), a Roman; successor of Adrian I. He was attacked about the face and eyes by members of Adrian's family, who hoped to render him unfit for the papacy. Leo recovered and fled (799) to Charlemagne's protection at Paderborn...
 
    Treaty of Verdun, End Empire Charlemagne
  Treaty of Verdun, End Empire Charlemagne
Verdun, Treaty of, the partition of Charlemagne's empire among three sons of Louis I, emperor of the West. Louis the German received the eastern portion (later Germany); Charles II (Charles the Bald) became king of the western portion (later France);...
 
    Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor
  Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor
The Holy Roman emperor Otto I, called Otto the Great, was the most powerful western European ruler after Charlemagne. He organized a strong German state and expanded his authority over Burgundy and Italy. He extended the frontiers of the German kingd...
 
    Dante, Writer of Divina Commedia
  Dante, Writer of Divina Commedia
Durante degli Alighieri was an Italian poet, prose writer, literary theorist, moral philosopher, and political thinker. He is best known for the monumental epic poem La commedia, later named La divina commedia (Divine Comedy), considered the greatest...
 
         



 
 
         
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